The Importance of Cleanrooms in Semiconductor Manufacturing

The only way to manage contamination is to control the total environment. Airflow and pressure, temperature and humidity, and specialized filtration all must be tightly monitored. While cleanrooms are planned and fabricated, in order to maintain quality, strict protocol and methods need to be enacted.

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Indoor Air Quality and the Aerospace / Cadmium Relationship

Workers can inhale cadmium dust, fumes, or mists but cadmium can also settle on skin and contaminate food and clothing. Elimination, avoidance, or containment of this noxious substance is imperative as contact with cadmium can damage the body’s cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal, neurological, reproductive, and respiratory systems. Cadmium is a known carcinogen.

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Workplace Indoor Air Quality and OSHA State Plans

Remedying poor workplace indoor air quality is more of a modern notion, one that did not become a driving force within the medical, environmental, and clean air policy communities until many years after pollution as a healthcare concern became a nationwide talking point.

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The Risk of Combustible Dust Explosions During Wood Flooring Manufacturing

The potential for dust particulates to ignite and create a flash fire or explosion is a constant hazard in just about every industry. The reason is that just about everything, including wood, has the potential to be combustible when in dust form. Because they are solids, the dusts and powders that settle onto equipment, in passageways, and in nooks and crannies of a manufacturing plant, accumulate.

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Working With Styrene

When most people hear the word “styrene”, they think first about the consumer scare in recent years of chemical leaching into our food and drink via plastic cups and containers. But the real threat – one that affects millions of people on a daily basis – is found at work, not in the kitchen

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