Indoor Air Quality Issues At Craft Breweries

In the last 20 years, craft brews have amassed a following that would have been unimaginable back when our Founding Fathers briefly entertained the idea to create a federal brewery to curb the growing popularity of spirits with the American public. Though the idea was eventually dismissed, malt beverages remained a favorite among the signers of the Declaration Of Independence. So much so, that when Thomas Jefferson retired from public service, he engaged in the art of beer making full-time. President Jefferson and his wife used hops and malts grown near their Monticello estate and developed their first bottled home brew in 1812.

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Combustible Dust Hazards In Manufacturing

One of the most horrific events of America’s industrial manufacturing history was the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Company factory fire in New York City. The tragedy, which killed 146 workers, led to the enactment of a succession of laws and regulations that eventually improved the protections and safety of all factory workers.

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The Occupational Risk: Toxic Benzene Exposure

Back in 1903, German coffee merchant, Ludwig Roselius, invented the first commercially effective decaffeination method. The “Roselius Process” blended steamed coffee beans with a brine solution then coated the mix in a natural chemical solvent to extract the caffeine. Though successful, the practice was no longer used once the extraction compound was deemed unsafe.

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Mold In Libraries Causes Significant Indoor Air Quality Problems

Mold in libraries is no small matter; just ask the staff of the Carnegie Library in our nation’s capital. In order to protect patrons and employees from potential harm due to mold-related IAQ problems, the Washington, DC building was closed for nearly four months beginning in September of last year while indoor air quality and mold remediation efforts were underway.

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Occupational Risk For Shoe Repairers

Those who remember the children’s story, The Elves And The Shoemaker, likely envision the protagonist hunched over his cobbler’s bench, surrounded by tools as he stitched together leather pieces and resoled a pair of boots. Nowhere in the picture books were plumes of dust depicted. Neither the shoemaker nor the elves that made and fixed the shoes were shown coughing from toxic fumes or wincing from the sting of dirty air. And yet, back then, it was most certainly the reality of the trade.

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Asbestos: An (IAQ) Problem In Numerous Industries

The September 11th terrorist attacks in 2001 claimed nearly 3,000 lives and wounded more than 6,000 others. Add to the devastation, the number of people who will die as a result of asbestos-related disease that developed after the rescue, recovery and cleanup efforts in New York City.

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Saving Mona Lisa: Eliminate Indoor Air Pollution

In the art conservation industry, professional painting conservators will tell you that regardless of the monetary worth of your artifact, indoor air pollution will, at some point, negatively affect the intrinsic value of the piece. In fact, as soon as an artist finishes his or her creation, aging and deterioration begin.

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